Tag Archives: Recovery

When the System Works Against Medication Adherence

Between 2004 and 2005, while serving as the Vice-Chairman (mental health consumer representative) on the New Jersey Governor’s Task Force on Mental Health, I had extreme difficulty seeing a psychiatrist. Ironically, this occurred when the task force was discussing Involuntary Outpatient Commitment (IOC) which is now accepted into New Jersey law even though it was strongly opposed by advocates and psychiatric rehabilitation professionals. I was in my 25th year as a service recipient in the public mental health system. I was working full-time and took the day off to attend the psychiatrist appointment. On my way out of a police academy, where I considered renewing my certification as a volunteer certified police instructor, I checked my voicemail to find a message stating: “Your appointment is cancelled today because the psychiatrist can no longer take your health insurance. You will be rescheduled with another staff psychiatrist.” Despite my paraprofessional status and own inferiority complex I went to the agency anyway. After meeting with a person of “authority” I was given permission to see the psychiatrist and thoughtfully informed I would be billed as if I were uninsured. The psychiatrist had no problem seeing me despite the internal agency bureaucracy and I left with my prescriptions. 

Needless to say, I detailed my experience to the task force. About 3 months later I went to see the new psychiatrist, well not really “new” as I had seen that psychiatrist before, but insurance approved. We know psychiatrists are stretched thin and see a lot of people and unfortunately the quality of service sometimes suffers.Nevertheless; when I tried to meet with the new psychiatrist after handing over my co-pay I was informed the psychiatrist was dealing with a crisis and could not give me a time when the psychiatrist would be available: i.e., 15 minutes, 30 minutes or an hour? The expectation was that I would sit and wait. I refused and asked for the prescription to be called in. The response, “we don’t do that.” I left and the psychiatrist called me. I stepped out of my deemed paraprofessional status and inferiority complex as we bantered over the telephone. The psychiatrist reluctantly conceded and called in my prescriptions.

The stigmatizing drama doesn’t stop there as 3 months later, for my next appointment, the same thing happened.  This time the psychiatrist and agency refused to call in my prescriptions, “they don’t do that” and really meant it.

The agency disregarded my time and whether or not I got my medication. However, they were timely mailing me a termination letter as if I were “non-compliant.” The letter failed to state I showed up for my appointments, I paid my copay, and then was told the psychiatrist was unavailable. Despite being in complete distress I advocated elsewhere for a referral. I was given a public system psychiatrist who I could only see if I would “commit” to see a therapist at the agency (see more on shared decision making here). I hadn’t seen a therapist in 3 years. I now figured I was going to lose my job, my career path and my social standing in the community. I was tired!And not going to beg anymore for medication! I’d end up in a state hospital or criminal justice system because of system’s lacking monitoring and oversight.

Fortunately, I got assistance from a friend who put me in touch with a private psychiatrist who even picked up their own phone. After the initial visit with the private psychiatrist I was asked to come back monthly then every 3 months for over a year. Since 2007 I see the psychiatrist every 6 months. Furthermore, I have met courageous individuals, who despite the organ damaging side effects, have relentlessly “adhered” to medication. After 20 years on a medication, I was taken off, as it would have damaged my kidneys. A different medication now processes through my liver.

I believe medication is only a small, often unflattering complex delivery system, and limited aspect of one’s recovery. My recovery is participating in valued social roles beyond the trial and error and limitations of medication. I welcome you to share your own medication experiences; nameless story of a loved one; and as providers your challenges/barriers and resolution ideas to improve medication services so that the system doesn’t impede consumer social roles such as worker, student, and more.

George Brice

A Personal Story

As we work to improve opportunities for people with the lived experience of mental illness, we inevitably find ourselves battling misinformation and prejudice. Whether you’re a peer, a consultant, a provider, a family member, or an educator, you have probably found yourself up against people who have very low expectations for people with mental illness. As vigorously as we challenge those beliefs, nothing is more powerful than a personal story. This link is to an article recently in the New York Times written by a law professor who has a diagnosis of schizophrenia. It is well worth the read.

Why Share Our Personal Recovery Narratives? A Tool for Respect!

I am grateful of a gentleman who shared his recovery story at a partial care program that I was attending in December of 1989. He traveled out of county working for Collaborative Support Programs of New Jersey, (CSPNJ) Inc. The guest speaker spoke of his challenges and the inspirational moments that gave him hope. He valued natural supports, acceptance of living with mental illness, achieving goals despite clinical diagnostic labeling, working full-time and more. Furthermore, I admired his courage to thoughtfully and intimately self-disclose his story with both peers and staff. His hopeful, genuine, and balanced narrative was exceedingly important to me.

I was submerged in lifeless depressive feelings, such as anxiety, stress, listlessness, apathy, isolation, invisibility, helplessness, hopelessness, worthlessness, anger, guilt, societal stigma, labeling, suicidal ideation, and more. I was a month shy of my 28th birthday when listening to my first personal recovery narrative/ lived experience presentation. I began to develop internal motivation based on peer support. The “peer role modeling,” unearthed my buried and dormant insight of lost self-awareness and lost citizenship.

I now had the energy and interest to disrupt the systematic and personal dependency of routinely attending partial care. I took steps to re-pursue occupational goals of work and college. Here I will outline some benefits for encouraging and respecting the sharing of personal recovery (mental illness and/or addiction concerns) narratives.

Personal Recovery Narrative:
1. Creative written/verbal task planning and learning experience
2. Help building self-esteem, self-worth and confidence
3. Transforming an Illness narrative to a Recovery narrative develop  positive self-talk, lessening perceived and real external (public) and internal (self) stigma
4. Opportunity to publicly “role model” hope- giving back, increasing citizenship feelings
5. Why self-disclose? Weighing benefits and addressing challenges

What has your experience been in utilizing people to share their personal narratives at your agency, school; corporate business, place of worship, home, community organization or other settings? What points would you like to make about sharing your own personal story? I am active in sharing my lived experience in varied settings. I will be building on my current comments and I look forward to your posts!

Work and Recovery

In my work as a service provider in the Psychiatric Rehabilitation field in a number of areas, I’ve been fortunate to see the positive impact of PsyR services on the recovery process. Services that help a person in recovery return to living in the community after sometimes spending years in a hospital is both a rewarding and inspiring experience for a service provider. However, in my experience, of all the rehabilitation services, facilitating the return to work has always appeared to have the greatest impact on the recovery process. In a matter of a few months, I’ve seen individuals literally blossom before my eyes! While providing supported employment services, one gentleman comes to mind that was particularly inspirational. I recalled meeting this job seeker for the first time and remember that he appeared a bit disheveled and unsure of himself. Nonetheless, there was a positive energy and determination to get back to work from day one. He worked tirelessly to improve his interviewing skills and update his résumé. He also starting going on job interviews although at first he was really nervous. After about four months he landed his first job in more than five years, and I will never forget the new bounce in his step and the new confidence he exuded. Within a year, he won employee of the month at his job! Returning to work really does wonders for the recovery process